Dr. Srinivas Patnaik
Associate Professor, Associate Dean (Research)
Ph. D. Institute Of Life Sciences, Bhubaneswar,Odisha, India
M. Sc. Department of Biotechnology, Goa University, Goa, India


Email:
[email protected]

Post-Doctoral Training

Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, USA (2010-2014)
Department of Physiology, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, USA (2009-2010)
Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, USA (2005-2008)
Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, USA (2004-2005)
GEI unit, IARC, World Health Organization, Lyon, France (2002-2004)

Awards/Honors

  • World Health Organization (WHO) Fellowship (STA) for pursuing research on cancer at International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, Lyon, France. 2002
  • Orissa Young Scientist Award, Department of Science and Technology, Orissa, India. 2000
  • Senior Research Scholarship award by UGC, India. 1998
  • Junior Research Scholarship award by UGC, India. 1996
  • National Scholarship awarded by Department of Biotechnology, India. 1994
  • Associate Member: American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
  • Associate Member: American Gastroenterological Association (AGA)
  • Life Member: Indian Association for Cancer Research (IACR)
  • Member: The International Mammalian Genome Society (IMGS)

Research Interest

Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition(EMT) is associated with the original embryonic development and also occurs during postnatal growth. The steps of this EMT type are specific and well-defined. Epithelial cells are cuboidal to cylindrical in shape and are in contact with each other via adherent and tight junctions. Primary migratory mesenchymal cells generated this way may potentially go through a reverse step to become epithelia again. This step is called the mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) and generates secondary epithelia in the developing embryo. EMT plays an important role in generation of fibroblasts to rebuild wounded tissues and also enables epithelial cells to acquire invasive mesenchymal phenotype characteristics that are essential in cancer metastasis, Differentiated cells in almost all organs in adults developed as a result of EMT-MET. Our lab focuses on role of several transcriptional regulators, non-coding RNAs, alternative splicing events and cell adhesion molecules that regulate EMT. Additionally, my lab also interested to check potentially druggable molecules capable of modulating EMT for therapeutics platforms.

Selected Publications

Full List
  1. Villin-1 and Gelsolin Regulate Changes in Actin Dynamics That Affect Cell Survival Signaling Pathways and Intestinal Inflammation. Gastroenterology. 2018 Apr;154(5):1405-1420.
  2. By moonlighting in the nucleus villin regulates epithelial plasticity. Mol Biol Cell. 2016 Feb 1;27(3):535-48
  3. Actin reorganization as the molecular basis for the regulation of apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Cell death and differentiation. 2012 Sep; 19 (9):1514-24.
  4. Ubiquitylation-independent degradation of Xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein is required for efficient nucleotide excision repair. Nucleic Acids Res. 2007; 35(16):5338-50.
  5. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates p53-mediated transcription at p21waf1 promoter .Oncogene. 2007 Jun 21; 26(29):4199-208.
  6. Ablation of PARP-1 does not interfere with the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but compromises the reactivation of stalled replication forks. Oncogene 2004 Mar 15.
  1. Circulating tumor stem cells and their characterization.
  2. Role of specific transcription factors in Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.
  3. Characterization of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in different human disease models.  
  1. Meharry Medical College, Nashville, TN, USA
  2. University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA
  3. IARC, Lyon, France

Ms. Ahana Addhaya
Topic: Regulation of EMT by specific transcription factors
[email protected]

 Ms. Anu Priya
Topic: Characterization of Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition in different human disease models.
[email protected]

  1. Villin-1 and Gelsolin Regulate Changes in Actin Dynamics That Affect Cell Survival Signaling Pathways and Intestinal Inflammation. Gastroenterology. 2018 Apr;154(5):1405-1420.
  2. Wang Y, George SP, Srinivasan K, Patnaik S and Khurana S. Actin reorganization as the molecular basis for the regulation of apoptosis in gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Cell death and differentiation. 2012 Sep;19(9):1514-24.
  3. El-Mahdy MA, Zhu Q, Wang QE, Wani G, Patnaik S, Zhao Q, Arafa el-S, Barakat B, Mir SN, Wani AA.Naringenin Protects HaCaT Human Keratinocytes Against UVB-induced Apoptosis and Enhances the Removal of Cyclobutane Pyrimidine Dimers from the Genome. Photochem Photobiol. 2008 Mar-Apr; 84(2):307-16.
  4. Wang QE, Praetorius-Ibba M, Zhu Q, El-Mahdy MA, Wani G, Zhao Q, Qin S, Patnaik S, Wani AA.Ubiquitylation-independent degradation of Xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein is required for efficient nucleotide excision repair. Nucleic Acids Res. 2007; 35(16):5338-50.
  5. Zhu Q, Wani G, Yao J, Patnaik S, Wang QE, El-Mahdy MA, Praetorius-Ibba M, Wani AA. The ubiquitin-proteasome system regulates p53-mediated transcription at p21waf1 promoter .Oncogene. 2007 Jun 21; 26(29):4199-208.
  6. Yang YG, Cortes U, Patnaik S, Jasin M and Wang ZQ. Ablation of PARP-1 does not interfere with the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, but compromises the reactivation of stalled replication forks.Oncogene 2004 Mar 15.
  7. Sahu GR, Nayak BK, Patnaik S, Parija T, Das BR. Rearrangement of p53 gene with overexpressed p53 protein in primary cervical cancer. Oncol Rep. 2002 Mar-Apr; 9(2): 433-7.
  8. Nagpal JK, Patnaik S, Das BR.  Prevalence of high-risk human papilloma virus types and its association with P53 codon 72 polymorphism in tobacco addicted oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients of Eastern India. Int J Cancer. 2002 Feb 10; 97(5): 649-53.
  9. Patnaik S, Nayak BK, Das BR. Rearrangement in the coding and 5' region of p53 gene in human oral tumors. IUBMB Life. 1999 Sep; 48(3): 305-9.
  10. Baral R, Patnaik S, Das BR.  Co-overexpression of p53 and c-myc proteins linked with advanced stages of betel- and tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinomas from eastern India. Eur J Oral Sci. 1998 Oct; 106(5): 907-13.
  11. Nayak BK, Patnaik S, Das BR.  Rearrangement of the p53 gene in human breast tumors. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1998 Apr 17; 245(2): 388-91.

Book Chapters:

  •  Nanomedicine; Handbook of Research on Diverse Applications of Nanotechnology in Biomedicine, Chemistry, and Engineering